TranspoAdvocate News

State & Local Funding News

TIAC staff tracks the latest state and local transportation funding news and provides regular updates on TranspoAdvocates News. To contribute to these efforts, contact Carolyn Kramer.


 

Aug. 13: Michigan Democrat Wins Primary With Transportation Investment Platform

Aug. 13: Michigan Democrat Wins Primary With Transportation Investment Platform

By Mark Holan, editorial director, ARTBA

“Fix the Damn Roads” is the top priority for the winner of Michigan’s Aug. 7, Democratic primary for governor.

“While politicians in Lansing (the state capital) vote down road funding solutions for political gain, the dire state of our highways is endangering our people and getting in the way of our economic prosperity,” Gretchen Whitmer, a former leader in the Michigan State Senate, says in the issues section of her website.

“We’re going to fix our roads the right way, the first time — with high-quality material and mix, so that we get the job done right,” her policy statement continues.

Bill Schuette, the state’s former attorney general, won the Republican primary. Roads, bridges and other transportation needs are not among the issues in “Bill’s Plan” on his campaign website.

Schuette has said he would order a review of the Michigan Department of Transportation and how it allocates dollars. He also has pledged to devote to roads any savings from the recent repeal of the state’s prevailing wage law for construction workers, which had guaranteed union-level pay on government building projects, but usually not roads, according to The Detroit News.

Whitmer is among 11 women nominated for governorships this year. Thirty-six states have governor races on Nov. 6.

This article was originally posted to ARTBA’s ‘Washington Newsline‘ on Aug. 10.

Aug. 9: 96 Percent of State Lawmakers Who Voted for a Gas Tax Increase Win Their 2018 Primaries

Aug. 9: 96 Percent of State Lawmakers Who Voted for a Gas Tax Increase Win Their 2018 Primaries

Ninety-six percent of state lawmakers who voted in favor of a gas tax increase and faced reelection in 2018 primaries will advance to the Nov. 6 general election, reinforcing earlier findings that showed the decision to vote for legislation to increase a state gas tax has little impact on re-election rates.

The 2018 primaries saw 802 legislators who voted on gas tax increase legislation from 12 states run for reelection. Of those lawmakers, 558 voted in favor of a gas tax increase and ran for reelection, with 536—or 96 percent—advancing on to November’s general election.

The numbers include 97 percent of the 263 lawmakers who are Democrats and won their primary (one race still pending), and 96 percent of the 282 lawmakers who are Republican and won their primary (one race still pending).

Of the 222 legislators who voted against a gas tax increase and ran for reelection, 215—or 97 percent—will move on to November’s general election. This includes 96 percent of 52 Democratic lawmakers (two races still pending) who won their primary, and 97 percent of 170 Republican lawmakers who are moving on.

An additional 22 lawmakers did not cast a vote on a gas tax increase measure and ran for reelection.

The results support earlier findings from ARTBA-TIAC that showed voting for a gas tax increase does not affect a lawmaker’s chance of reelection. In the 16 states that increased their gas tax rates or equivalent measures between 2013 and 2016, nearly all (92 percent) of the 1,354 state legislators who voted for a gas tax increase and stood for reelection between 2013 and 2017 were sent back to the state house by voters. Of the 712 elected officials who voted against a gas tax increase, 93 percent were also given another term.

Six Regional Reports Highlight Boost to California Localities from Transportation Investment in SB 1

Six Regional Reports Highlight Boost to California Localities from Transportation Investment in SB 1

Reports at www.artba.org Illustrate Benefits to Orange County;
Los Angeles County; Inland Empire; San Diego and Imperial Counties; San Francisco Bay Area; & San Joaquin Valley

(WASHINGTON) – A series of six new reports find that an April 2017 California law will generate between $9.7 billion and $34.5 billion in economic activity and user benefits in California’s major regions over the next decade. The additional demand, in turn, will support or create tens of thousands of jobs throughout the state—with over half coming in sectors outside of the construction industry.

The extensive analyses, conducted by American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) Chief Economist Dr. Alison Premo Black, examine the numerous impacts of Senate Bill 1 (SB 1)—the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017—on each of the six major regions in California. The measure included $5 billion annually in new investment for the state’s highways and local streets, bridges and transit systems.

The reports quantify the direct and indirect economic impacts, safety benefits, lower operating costs, reduced congestion, modernized equipment and increased mobility that will result over the 10 years from increased investment in SB 1 in each of the regions.

Among the key findings:

• In the San Francisco Bay Area, SB 1 will generate $34.5 billion in economic activity and user benefits over 10 years. This includes $9.8 billion in savings for drivers, transit riders and businesses, and $19.3 billion in economic output. In addition, the increased investment will create or support nearly 12,300 jobs per year, totaling 122,932 job-years over 10 years; these workers will earn $5.4 billion.

• In the San Joaquin Valley, SB 1 will generate $20.1 billion in economic activity and user benefits over 10 years. This includes $4.9 billion in savings for drivers, transit riders and businesses, and $11.9 billion in economic output. In addition, the increased investment will create or support over 6,600 jobs per year, or 66,398 job-years over 10 years; these workers will earn $3.2 billion.

• In Los Angeles County, SB 1 will generate $29.2 billion in economic activity and user benefits over 10 years. This includes $6.8 billion in savings for drivers, transit riders and businesses, and $18.0 billion in economic output. In addition, the increased investment will create or support over 9,000 jobs per year, totaling 90,161 job-years over 10 years; these workers will earn $4.3 billion.

• In the Inland Empire, SB 1 will generate $15.6 billion in economic activity and user benefits over 10 years. This includes $3.3 billion in savings for drivers, transit riders and businesses, and $9.9 billion in economic output. In addition, the increased investment will create or support over 4,900 jobs per year, or 49,598 job-years over 10 years; these workers will earn $2.5 billion.

• In San Diego and Imperial Counties, SB 1 will generate $13.8 billion in economic activity and user benefits over 10 years. This includes $3.4 billion in savings for drivers, transit riders and businesses, and $8.1 billion in economic output. In addition, the increased investment will create or support nearly 5,000 jobs per year, totaling 49,455 job-years over 10 years; these workers will earn $2.3 billion.

• In Orange County, SB 1 will generate $9.7 billion in economic activity and user benefits over 10 years. This includes $2.3 billion in savings for drivers, transit riders and businesses, and $6 billion in economic output. In addition, the increased investment will create or support over 2,700 jobs per year, totaling 27,537 job-years over 10 years; these workers will earn $1.4 billion.

These regional reports build upon a statewide analysis of the impacts of SB 1 on California, released by ARTBA in February. That report found that the law will generate nearly $183 billion in economic activity and user benefits throughout all sectors of the state’s economy over 10 years. The additional demand, in turn, will support or create an average of over 68,200 jobs per year, adding up to over 682,000 job-years over the next decade. Visit the economics section of www.artba.org to see the key findings of the statewide report.

About ARTBA: Established in 1902 and with more than 8,000 public and private sector members, ARTBA advocates for strong federal investment in transportation to meet the public and business community demand for safe and efficient travel.

Since 2000, Dr. Black and her team have authored more than 90 national and state studies examining transportation/bridge funding and investment patterns. Dr. Black has a Ph.D. in economics from the George Washington University and a master’s in international economics and Latin American Studies from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

July 27: State Transportation Funding News Roundup

July 27: State Transportation Funding News Roundup

The Connecticut State Bond Commission authorized $10 million on July 25 to study tolling on state highways. Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker estimates toll revenues could generate up to $1 billion annually. Read More >>

The Association of County Commissions of Alabama reported July 20 that a new gas tax proposal is in development for the 2019 legislative session. Read More>>

Missouri Governor Mike Parson (R) met with mayors from the Kansas City region on July 17 as part of his listening tour. Local leaders have stated support for the November gas tax ballot measure, which would increase the state gas tax by 10 cents over a four-year period. Read More>>

Theresa Ranni, ARTBA TIAC/Economics Intern, contributed to this report.

July 13: State Transportation Funding News Roundup

July 13: State Transportation Funding News Roundup

A Nov. 6 California ballot measure will decide whether to mandate a state referendum for any gas tax increases, retroactive to January 2017. The immediate impact would be the repeal of Senate Bill (SB) 1, which raises an estimated $5.2 billion annually for transportation infrastructure through a 12 cents-per-gallon gas tax increase and raises in other transportation-related expenses. More than 200 projects throughout the state risk delay or cancelation if SB1 is repealed. Read More>>

A Georgia tax revenue sheet released July 9 revealed an 8 percent, or $11.9 million, increase in gas tax revenue. A portion of gas tax revenue funds road and construction initiatives throughout the state. Read More>>

Maine legislators unanimously passed legislation on July 9 to place a transportation bond issuance measure on the November ballot. This measure would secure $106 million for various transportation projects throughout the state. Read More>>

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (R) signed a bill on July 2 establishing a 27-member commission to provide insight on long-term infrastructure plans. Read More>>

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant (R) on July 6 suggested the possibility of a special session to secure an additional $200 million annually for transportation initiatives through taxes on internet sales, sports betting, and a state lottery. Read More>>

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts (R) announced on July 1 a five-year transportation plan that will allocate an unprecedented $600 million to transportation projects throughout the state. Federal funding makes up 40 percent of the revenue. Read More>>

The Illinois Department of Transportation pledged $2 billion for infrastructure projects this year as part of a six-year, $11 billion transportation plan. Experts suggest that the new plan falls short by billions of dollars needed to address long-term infrastructure concerns. Read More>>

Ohio gubernatorial candidates on July 11 discussed ideas to provide new revenue for transportation infrastructure projects. Read More>>

Theresa Ranni, ARTBA TIAC/Economics Intern, contributed to this report.